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Regel 85: Regel 85:
  
 
Charles Émile Waldteufel (eigenlijk: Charles Émile Lévy) (Straatsburg, Elzas, 9 december 1837 – Parijs, 12 februari 1915) was een Frans componist, muziekpedagoog en dirigent.  
 
Charles Émile Waldteufel (eigenlijk: Charles Émile Lévy) (Straatsburg, Elzas, 9 december 1837 – Parijs, 12 februari 1915) was een Frans componist, muziekpedagoog en dirigent.  
Zijn ouders waren Lazare Lévy, geboren op 30 januari 1801 in Bischheim, Elzas, -die het pseudoniem Louis Waldteufel gebruikte-en Flora Neubauer, pianiste en lerares voor solozang. De eerste muziekles kreeg hij van zijn ouders, in het bijzonder van zijn moeder. In 1842 vertrokken zijn ouders met hem naar Parijs. Zijn broer Isaac (1832-1884), die als Léon Waldteufel bekend werd, was begonnen viool te studeren aan het Parijse conservatorium. Van 1853 tot 1857 ging ook Charles Émile aan het Conservatoire national supérieur de musique en studeerde daar onder andere samen met Georges Bizet en Jules Massenet piano.  
+
Zijn ouders waren Lazare Lévy, geboren op 30 januari 1801 in Bischheim, Elzas, -die het pseudoniem Louis Waldteufel gebruikte-en Flora Neubauer, pianiste en lerares voor solozang. De eerste muziekles kreeg hij van zijn ouders, in het bijzonder van zijn moeder. In 1842 vertrokken zijn ouders met hem naar Parijs. Zijn broer Isaac (1832-1884), die als Léon Waldteufel bekend werd, was begonnen viool te studeren aan het Parijse conservatorium. Van 1853 tot 1857 ging ook Charles Émile aan het Conservatoire national supérieur de musique en studeerde daar onder andere samen met [[Georges Bizet]] en [[Jules Massenet]] piano.  
 +
 
 +
Hofbalkapelmeester van Napoleon  III de Weense wals in Frankrijk geliefd gemaakt.
 +
 
 +
pianist and one of the best-known waltz composers of his time.
 +
 
 +
Born of a musical family, Waldteufel studied with his parents and later at the Paris Conservatory, after which time he worked for a piano manufacturer, gave piano lessons, and played at soirees.
 +
 
 +
In 1865 he became court pianist to Empress Eugénie and the following year conductor of court balls. With the success of his first waltzes, Waldteufel decided to devote himself entirely to composing dance music, producing some 270 dances, including waltzes, polkas, and galops. Among his famous waltzes are The Skaters, Estudiantina, and Dolores.
 +
 
 +
The Skaters’ Waltz, Op. 183, also called The Skaters, or French Les Patineurs, waltz by French composer Emil Waldteufel written in 1882. Of Waldteufel’s many compositions—including more than 200 dance pieces—The Skaters’ Waltz is the best-known.
 +
 
 +
In The Skaters’ Waltz Waldteufel set out to capture the atmosphere of a winter day in Paris, with ice-skaters venturing onto the frozen Seine River. In the manner of his older rival Johann Strauss, Waldteufel’s piece offers a sequence of contrasting serene and exuberant waltz themes, rather than just a single melody. A slow opening passage for solo horn is followed by graceful rising and falling lines in the strings and woodwinds that lead to the first waltz theme. There, again, the horn takes the central role. The wintry ambience of the piece is enhanced by the use of sleigh bells in the percussion section.
 +
 
 +
Émile Waldteufel (German for forest devil) was born at 84 Grand'Rue in the centre of Strasbourg. His grandfather and father were both musicians; his mother Flora Neubauer, originally from Bavaria had been a student of Hummel and had met Haydn; she was a keen singer and dancer also. From a Jewish Alsatian family of musicians, the original family surname had been Lévy. His father Louis had a respected orchestra, and his brother Léon was a successful performer. When Léon won a place to study violin performance at the Conservatoire de Paris, the family followed him there.
 +
 
 +
Waldteufel received his first lessons from his father and the local musician Joseph Heyberger; after his arrival in Paris he was able to take elementary classes from Laurent at the Conservatoire de Paris, followed by advanced studies under Marmontel. Among his fellow pupils was Jules Massenet.
 +
 
 +
The young Émile was obliged to halt his studies and work at the Scholtus piano factory owing to the financial situation of the family, but soon took a room in rue de Bellefond in order to concentrate on composing. During his time at the conservatory, Louis Waldteufel's orchestra became one of the most famous in Paris, and Émile was frequently invited to play at important events.
 +
 
 +
At the age of 27, Émile became the court pianist of the Empress Eugénie. He also led the orchestra at state balls.[5] His appointment by Napoléon III to the musical direction of the balls led him to participation in the events in Biarritz and Compiègne; at the latter he met many other musicians and artists and also accompanied the Emperor playing the violin.[2]
 +
 
 +
In 1868 he married Célestine Dufau, a former singer from Toulouse who had appeared at the Opéra-Comique. They had three children, Louis René, Émile René and Berthe.[2]
 +
 
 +
At the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War Waldteufel enlisted and was stationed in the Basses-Pyrénées. After the defeat of France the Second French Empire was dissolved and his home town became part of Germany for the rest of his life. After the Empire, the orchestra still played at Presidential balls at the Élysée. At this time only a few members of the French high society knew of Émile; he was nearly 40 before he became better known.
 +
 
 +
In October 1874 Waldteufel played at an event that was attended by the then Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. The Prince was enthralled by Waldteufel's "Manolo" waltz, and was prepared to make Waldteufel's music known in Britain.[6] A long-term contract with the London-based editor Hopwood & Crew followed. Part of the company belonged to Charles Coote, director of the Coote & Tinney's Band, the first dance orchestra in London. Through these means, Waldteufel's music was played at Buckingham Palace in front of Queen Victoria. Waldteufel dominated the music scene in London and became world-famous. During this period he composed his best known works, many of which are still heard today around the world. He became best known for the waltz "Les Patineurs" (The Ice Skaters), composed in 1882.
 +
 
 +
Waldteufel gave concerts in several European cities, such as London in 1885, Berlin in 1889, where he enjoyed a friendly rivalry with Johann Strauss, and the Paris Opéra Balls in 1890 and 1891. He continued his career as conductor and writing dance music for the Presidential Balls until 1899 when he retired.
 +
 
 +
On 12 February 1915 Waldteufel died at his home, 37 rue Saint-Georges in Paris, at the age of 77. He and his wife, who had died the previous year, were buried in Père Lachaise.
 +
 
 +
Waldteufel composed at and for the piano (often for performance at court) before orchestrating each work.[7] He conducted with a stick rather than the then-customary violin bow. The typical Waldteufel orchestra consisted of strings and a doubled woodwind section, two cornets, four horns, three trombones, and ophicleide or euphonium, along with percussion. Waldteufel's music can be distinguished from Johann Strauss II's waltzes and polkas in that he used subtle harmonies and gentle phrases, unlike Strauss's more robust approach.
 +
 
 +
Waldteufel's 1886 waltz España is largely based on Chabrier's España but also includes a section from Chabrier's Une Éducation manquée.
 +
 
 +
-------------------------
 +
La Valse des patineurs (The Skater’s Waltz) is one of the most famous waltzes in the world. Many people think Johan Strauss wrote it. But they are wrong! The Skater’s Waltz was written by Emile Waldteufel, French musician born in Strasbourg in 1837 into a Jewish family. His grand-father, Moyse Lévy was a traveling musician in Bischheim (Alsace).
 +
Due to the Napoleonian decree of July 28th 1808 forcing all the Jews to have a “definite name” in order to facilitate their survey and civil-state registry, Moyse Lévy chose to be called Waldteufel.
 +
One of his sons, Lazare Lévy aka Louis Waldteufel (1801-1884), fiddler and conductor, had four sons: Achille (1830-?), Isaac (1832-1884), called Léon, court conductor for balls, and Charles-Emile (1837-1915), called Emile, who was the most famous and prolific composer of the family.
 +
 
 +
In 1844, his family goes to Paris in order for Léon to learn violin in the Conservatory. Then it’s Emile, from 1853 to 1857, who is enrolled to learn the piano; Jules Massenet and Georges Bizet are his classmates. Waldteufel, like many other pianists during that time, composed his works on the piano, but with the perspective of future orchestration depending on for which kind of performance it would be used (private salons, ballrooms or outside balls).
 +
During the Second Empire, Waldteufel wrote many dances which will make him known. In 1865, particularly liked by Eugénie, he becomes director of dance music of the imperial court of Napoleon III and the entitled pianist of the empress. He is put in charge of the famous dance evenings of Biarritz and Compiègne. From 1867 on, Waldteufel’s orchestra performs for the balls in the Tuileries Garden, following what did Isaac Strauss.
 +
 
 +
In 1874, he is noticed by the Prince of Wales, future Edward VII, who gives him the opportunity to become known in Great-Britain. He then signs a contract with the editing company of London Hopwood & Crew which allows him to be played during the balls of Queen Victoria at the Buckingham Palace. His music is at the top of the programs for many years. The Skater’s Waltz (1882) gives him an international fame, and he is then played in London, Berlin and Paris with great success until the beginning of the 20th century.
 +
 
 +
Waldteufel’s music is defined by a melodic pattern in the tradition of French composers of the time such as Gounod, Saint-Saëns or Bizet. His inspiration goes from comical operas by Audran, Lacome or Offenbach to more popular Bavarian music (that he knows from his mother) or Bohemian folklore. His abundant work contains mainly music for dancing: waltzes, polkas and mazurkas, as well as several melodies who made his reputation.
 +
 
 +
Nadat Waldteufel aan het conservatorium samen met Georges Bizet en Jules Massenet aan het conservatorium van Parijs gestudeerd had.
 +
Hij had zoveel succes met de door hemzelf uitgegeven walsen Joies et peines en Manolo dat hij besloot zich geheel aan het componeren van dansmuziek te wijden.
 +
In 1865 werd hij kamerpianist van de keizerin Eugénie en in 1866 keizerlijke hofkapelmeester. In die functie dirigeerde hij de pronkerige balfeesten in Parijs. Hij componeerde hiervoor zijn bekende walsen en polka's.
 +
Als toondichter openbaarde deze van geboorte Straatsburger zich vooral met zijn vele danscomposities, waaronder marsen, polka's en ongeveer driehonderd walsen (onder meer "Estudiantina" en "España"). Tijdens een bezoek aan Berlijn zou Waldteugen een muzikaal duel met de "Walskoning" Johann Strauss junior geleverd hebben, dat onbeslist eindigde.
 +
Waldteufel schreef zijn walsen voor de danszaal, terwijl Johann Strauss' walsen in de eerste plaats concertwalsen zijn, meer bedoeld om naar te luisteren. Tot zijn bekendste werken behoren Les patineurs, Estudiantina, España, Mon rêve en Très jolie.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
  
  
Regel 99: Regel 157:
 
* In 1793 schreef hij: ''La fille coupable'' (Het schuldige meisje), in twee aktes, die op 2 november 1793 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.   
 
* In 1793 schreef hij: ''La fille coupable'' (Het schuldige meisje), in twee aktes, die op 2 november 1793 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.   
 
* In 1795 voltooide hij ''Rosalie et Myrza'' in drie 3 aktes, die op 28 oktober 1795 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.
 
* In 1795 voltooide hij ''Rosalie et Myrza'' in drie 3 aktes, die op 28 oktober 1795 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.
 +
 
==Parijs==
 
==Parijs==
 
[[Afbeelding:Boieldieu ca 1800.jpg|thumb|270px|left|<big>François-Adrien Boieldieu ca 1800</big>]]  
 
[[Afbeelding:Boieldieu ca 1800.jpg|thumb|270px|left|<big>François-Adrien Boieldieu ca 1800</big>]]  

Versie van 10 feb 2019 om 19:56

Nootje.pngDit artikel valt onder beheer van Dorp:Luisterrijk. Nootje.png

==Charles Émile Waldteufel

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François-Adrien Boieldieu (Rouen, 16 december 1775Varennes-Jarcy, departement Seine-et-Oise, 8 oktober 1834) was een Frans componist van voornamelijk walsen.

Eerste walsen

Émile Waldteufel





Émile Waldteufel

Charles Émile Waldteufel

Charles Émile Waldteufel

Algemene informatie Volledige naam Charles Émile Waldteufel Bijnaam Charles Émile Lévy Geboren 9 december 1837 Overleden 12 februari 1915 Land Vlag van Frankrijk Frankrijk Werk Genre(s) Klassiek Beroep Componist, muziekpedagoog, dirigent



Charles Émile Waldteufel (eigenlijk: Charles Émile Lévy) (Straatsburg, Elzas, 9 december 1837 – Parijs, 12 februari 1915) was een Frans componist, muziekpedagoog en dirigent. Zijn ouders waren Lazare Lévy, geboren op 30 januari 1801 in Bischheim, Elzas, -die het pseudoniem Louis Waldteufel gebruikte-en Flora Neubauer, pianiste en lerares voor solozang. De eerste muziekles kreeg hij van zijn ouders, in het bijzonder van zijn moeder. In 1842 vertrokken zijn ouders met hem naar Parijs. Zijn broer Isaac (1832-1884), die als Léon Waldteufel bekend werd, was begonnen viool te studeren aan het Parijse conservatorium. Van 1853 tot 1857 ging ook Charles Émile aan het Conservatoire national supérieur de musique en studeerde daar onder andere samen met Georges Bizet en Jules Massenet piano.

Hofbalkapelmeester van Napoleon III de Weense wals in Frankrijk geliefd gemaakt.

pianist and one of the best-known waltz composers of his time.

Born of a musical family, Waldteufel studied with his parents and later at the Paris Conservatory, after which time he worked for a piano manufacturer, gave piano lessons, and played at soirees.

In 1865 he became court pianist to Empress Eugénie and the following year conductor of court balls. With the success of his first waltzes, Waldteufel decided to devote himself entirely to composing dance music, producing some 270 dances, including waltzes, polkas, and galops. Among his famous waltzes are The Skaters, Estudiantina, and Dolores.

The Skaters’ Waltz, Op. 183, also called The Skaters, or French Les Patineurs, waltz by French composer Emil Waldteufel written in 1882. Of Waldteufel’s many compositions—including more than 200 dance pieces—The Skaters’ Waltz is the best-known.

In The Skaters’ Waltz Waldteufel set out to capture the atmosphere of a winter day in Paris, with ice-skaters venturing onto the frozen Seine River. In the manner of his older rival Johann Strauss, Waldteufel’s piece offers a sequence of contrasting serene and exuberant waltz themes, rather than just a single melody. A slow opening passage for solo horn is followed by graceful rising and falling lines in the strings and woodwinds that lead to the first waltz theme. There, again, the horn takes the central role. The wintry ambience of the piece is enhanced by the use of sleigh bells in the percussion section.

Émile Waldteufel (German for forest devil) was born at 84 Grand'Rue in the centre of Strasbourg. His grandfather and father were both musicians; his mother Flora Neubauer, originally from Bavaria had been a student of Hummel and had met Haydn; she was a keen singer and dancer also. From a Jewish Alsatian family of musicians, the original family surname had been Lévy. His father Louis had a respected orchestra, and his brother Léon was a successful performer. When Léon won a place to study violin performance at the Conservatoire de Paris, the family followed him there.

Waldteufel received his first lessons from his father and the local musician Joseph Heyberger; after his arrival in Paris he was able to take elementary classes from Laurent at the Conservatoire de Paris, followed by advanced studies under Marmontel. Among his fellow pupils was Jules Massenet.

The young Émile was obliged to halt his studies and work at the Scholtus piano factory owing to the financial situation of the family, but soon took a room in rue de Bellefond in order to concentrate on composing. During his time at the conservatory, Louis Waldteufel's orchestra became one of the most famous in Paris, and Émile was frequently invited to play at important events.

At the age of 27, Émile became the court pianist of the Empress Eugénie. He also led the orchestra at state balls.[5] His appointment by Napoléon III to the musical direction of the balls led him to participation in the events in Biarritz and Compiègne; at the latter he met many other musicians and artists and also accompanied the Emperor playing the violin.[2]

In 1868 he married Célestine Dufau, a former singer from Toulouse who had appeared at the Opéra-Comique. They had three children, Louis René, Émile René and Berthe.[2]

At the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War Waldteufel enlisted and was stationed in the Basses-Pyrénées. After the defeat of France the Second French Empire was dissolved and his home town became part of Germany for the rest of his life. After the Empire, the orchestra still played at Presidential balls at the Élysée. At this time only a few members of the French high society knew of Émile; he was nearly 40 before he became better known.

In October 1874 Waldteufel played at an event that was attended by the then Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. The Prince was enthralled by Waldteufel's "Manolo" waltz, and was prepared to make Waldteufel's music known in Britain.[6] A long-term contract with the London-based editor Hopwood & Crew followed. Part of the company belonged to Charles Coote, director of the Coote & Tinney's Band, the first dance orchestra in London. Through these means, Waldteufel's music was played at Buckingham Palace in front of Queen Victoria. Waldteufel dominated the music scene in London and became world-famous. During this period he composed his best known works, many of which are still heard today around the world. He became best known for the waltz "Les Patineurs" (The Ice Skaters), composed in 1882.

Waldteufel gave concerts in several European cities, such as London in 1885, Berlin in 1889, where he enjoyed a friendly rivalry with Johann Strauss, and the Paris Opéra Balls in 1890 and 1891. He continued his career as conductor and writing dance music for the Presidential Balls until 1899 when he retired.

On 12 February 1915 Waldteufel died at his home, 37 rue Saint-Georges in Paris, at the age of 77. He and his wife, who had died the previous year, were buried in Père Lachaise.

Waldteufel composed at and for the piano (often for performance at court) before orchestrating each work.[7] He conducted with a stick rather than the then-customary violin bow. The typical Waldteufel orchestra consisted of strings and a doubled woodwind section, two cornets, four horns, three trombones, and ophicleide or euphonium, along with percussion. Waldteufel's music can be distinguished from Johann Strauss II's waltzes and polkas in that he used subtle harmonies and gentle phrases, unlike Strauss's more robust approach.

Waldteufel's 1886 waltz España is largely based on Chabrier's España but also includes a section from Chabrier's Une Éducation manquée.


La Valse des patineurs (The Skater’s Waltz) is one of the most famous waltzes in the world. Many people think Johan Strauss wrote it. But they are wrong! The Skater’s Waltz was written by Emile Waldteufel, French musician born in Strasbourg in 1837 into a Jewish family. His grand-father, Moyse Lévy was a traveling musician in Bischheim (Alsace).

Due to the Napoleonian decree of July 28th 1808 forcing all the Jews to have a “definite name” in order to facilitate their survey and civil-state registry, Moyse Lévy chose to be called Waldteufel.
One of his sons, Lazare Lévy aka Louis Waldteufel (1801-1884), fiddler and conductor, had four sons: Achille (1830-?), Isaac (1832-1884), called Léon, court conductor for balls, and Charles-Emile (1837-1915), called Emile, who was the most famous and prolific composer of the family.

In 1844, his family goes to Paris in order for Léon to learn violin in the Conservatory. Then it’s Emile, from 1853 to 1857, who is enrolled to learn the piano; Jules Massenet and Georges Bizet are his classmates. Waldteufel, like many other pianists during that time, composed his works on the piano, but with the perspective of future orchestration depending on for which kind of performance it would be used (private salons, ballrooms or outside balls). During the Second Empire, Waldteufel wrote many dances which will make him known. In 1865, particularly liked by Eugénie, he becomes director of dance music of the imperial court of Napoleon III and the entitled pianist of the empress. He is put in charge of the famous dance evenings of Biarritz and Compiègne. From 1867 on, Waldteufel’s orchestra performs for the balls in the Tuileries Garden, following what did Isaac Strauss.

In 1874, he is noticed by the Prince of Wales, future Edward VII, who gives him the opportunity to become known in Great-Britain. He then signs a contract with the editing company of London Hopwood & Crew which allows him to be played during the balls of Queen Victoria at the Buckingham Palace. His music is at the top of the programs for many years. The Skater’s Waltz (1882) gives him an international fame, and he is then played in London, Berlin and Paris with great success until the beginning of the 20th century.

Waldteufel’s music is defined by a melodic pattern in the tradition of French composers of the time such as Gounod, Saint-Saëns or Bizet. His inspiration goes from comical operas by Audran, Lacome or Offenbach to more popular Bavarian music (that he knows from his mother) or Bohemian folklore. His abundant work contains mainly music for dancing: waltzes, polkas and mazurkas, as well as several melodies who made his reputation.

Nadat Waldteufel aan het conservatorium samen met Georges Bizet en Jules Massenet aan het conservatorium van Parijs gestudeerd had. Hij had zoveel succes met de door hemzelf uitgegeven walsen Joies et peines en Manolo dat hij besloot zich geheel aan het componeren van dansmuziek te wijden. In 1865 werd hij kamerpianist van de keizerin Eugénie en in 1866 keizerlijke hofkapelmeester. In die functie dirigeerde hij de pronkerige balfeesten in Parijs. Hij componeerde hiervoor zijn bekende walsen en polka's. Als toondichter openbaarde deze van geboorte Straatsburger zich vooral met zijn vele danscomposities, waaronder marsen, polka's en ongeveer driehonderd walsen (onder meer "Estudiantina" en "España"). Tijdens een bezoek aan Berlijn zou Waldteugen een muzikaal duel met de "Walskoning" Johann Strauss junior geleverd hebben, dat onbeslist eindigde. Waldteufel schreef zijn walsen voor de danszaal, terwijl Johann Strauss' walsen in de eerste plaats concertwalsen zijn, meer bedoeld om naar te luisteren. Tot zijn bekendste werken behoren Les patineurs, Estudiantina, España, Mon rêve en Très jolie.








drien Boieldieu - was secretaris bij de aartsbisschop van Rouen, zodat het zeer voor de hand lag, dat François-Adrien van de koorleider Urbain Cornonnier muziekles kreeg. Later kreeg hij ook nog onderricht van de organist Charles Broche van de Kathedraal Notre-Dame te Rouen.
Boieldieu had al heel jong een grote voorliefde voor de opera. Dé favoriete opera aan het einde van de achttiende eeuw was in Rouen de Opéra Comique.
Zijn eerste opera's maakte Boieldieu op libretti van zijn vader.

  • In 1793 schreef hij: La fille coupable (Het schuldige meisje), in twee aktes, die op 2 november 1793 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.
  • In 1795 voltooide hij Rosalie et Myrza in drie 3 aktes, die op 28 oktober 1795 in Théâtre des Arts in Rouen in première ging.

Parijs

François-Adrien Boieldieu ca 1800

Boieldieu vertrok naar Parijs waar zijn opera Le Calife de Bagdad in 1800 een doorslaand succes had. Toch vond hij, dat er nog veel te leren viel over de muziek. Hij werd leerling van Luigi Cherubini om onder meer contrapunt te studeren. Daar werd hij ook bevriend met Étienne Nicolas Méhul en andere componisten.
In Parijs schreef hij nog meer opera's. Tot 1831 - dus bijna tot aan zijn dood - bleef Boieldieu opera's schrijven, waaronder uitblinkers als: Jean de Paris en La Dame blanche.
Zijn in 1802 gesloten huwelijk met danseres Cotilde Malfreuroy bleek niet erg gelukkig, en hij vertrok in 1803 naar St. Petersburg waar hij in 1804 tot dirigent werd benoemd aan het Tsarenhof. Acht jaar later keerde hij terug naar Parijs, en werd daar in 1817 leraar compositie aan het Conservatoire national supérieur de musique als opvolger van Étienne Nicolas Méhul. In 1820 ontving hij de Légion d'honneur voor zijn verdiensten als componist en docent.
Hoewel zijn reputatie grotendeels gebaseerd is op zijn opera's, componeerde Boieldieu ook andere werken, zoals het Harpconcert in C, geschreven in 1800-1801, dat een zeer geliefd muziekstuk is geworden.
Boieldieu leefde verder gescheiden van zijn vrouw Clotilde tot haar dood in 1827, waarna hij trouwde met de zangeres Jeanne Phillis-Bertin, met wie hij al een lang lopende verhouding had. In 1817 werd hij lid van het Le Institute 1).
Aangezien hij geregeld ziek was, leefde hij in deze tijd veel in zijn landhuis in Villeneuve-Saint-Georges, in het departement Val-de-Marne en componeerde hij heel weinig.

Dit is een artikel uit de serie:
Bekende melodie,
onbekende componist
Si j'etais Roi
Menuet, Kwintet opus 13, nr. 5
Le Calife de Bagdad
On hearing the first Cukoo in Spring
Berceuse de Jocelyn
Plaisir d' Amour
Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor
De Urendans, La Giaconda
Dona Diana, Moretto

François-Adrien Boieldieu was een componist, die tijdens zijn leven veel succes had met zijn opera's. Van deze opera's en al zijn andere werk wordt tegenwoordig niet veel meer uitgevoerd. Wel houdt zijn Harpconcert in C nog steeds repertoire.
Een ander muziekstuk – de ouverture Le Calife de Bagdad – is ook nog geregeld in de concertzaal te horen.
De ouverture Le Calife de Bagdad zet rustig in, bijna zangerig. Daarna volgen snelle passages elkaar vloeiend op, waarna het hele orkest inzet met afwisselende thema's.

Tegenslagen

Door de Julirevolutie in 1830 verloor Boieldieu in één keer al zijn betrekkingen. De Julirevolutie was een opstand die door de middenklasse in Frankrijk tegen koning Karel X werd gevoerd.
Door het bankroet van de Opera Comique en de verbanning van Karel X - van wie hij een toelage had - brachten hem in financiële problemen. Om uit deze misère te komen, kreeg hij van Adolphe Thiers - die premier was in 1836, 1840 en 1848 - een staatspensioen van 6000 francs, wat nu ongeveer € 20.000 zou zijn.
Korte tijd na zijn financiële en maatschappelijke problemen werd hij ernstig ziek en verloor geleidelijk aan het vermogen om te spreken, als gevolg van kanker van het strottenhoofd, en kreeg hij daarbij nog tuberculose, waaraan hij op 8 oktober in 1834 overleed.
Hij werd vanuit zijn landhuis in Varennes-Jarcy begraven op de begraafplaats Père-Lachaise in Parijs, maar zijn hart werd op 13 november bijgezet op de monumentale begraafplaats van Rouen in een door de stad aangeboden tombe.

Nageslacht

De zoon van Boieldieu: Adrien (1816-1883) - opgeleid aan het conservatorium onder zijn vader - was ook componist. Zijn kleindochter, de pianiste Louise Boieldieu, dochter van Adrien Boieldieu en Fanny Defourneaux, trouwde met de componist Émile Durand, die eigenlijk meer een muziekwetenschapper was. Hij kreeg meer bekendheid door zijn publicaties dan door zijn composities.

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